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Reader says , “Ridgewood Schools Fail to Develop Male Students of High Academic Potential “

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“The Ridgewood district has also chronically failed to adequately encourage and adequately develop students who early on demonstrate extremely very high academic potential, but also who have moderate emotional or behavioral challenges and/or ADHD, or who happen to be male. (Oops–was only thinking that last part, didn’t mean to blurt it out. How rude to admit the hard and naked truth of Nothern New Jersey public schools in 2019.)

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Reader says , “There’s too much talk about diversity and inclusion and less about discipline and competence”

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The rankings measure how well the competition does, as well as Ridgewood school district. Without proper analysis, one can’t assume the drop in Ridgewood rankings is due to declining quality. It could just be other schools started to deliver better performance than before.

I am concerned about indoctrination in the school system though. There’s too much talk about diversity and inclusion and less about discipline and competence.

Continue reading Reader says , “There’s too much talk about diversity and inclusion and less about discipline and competence”
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Reader Comments on School Ranking Fairness

Ridgewood Police at RHS

Schooldigger, I’m afraid your list somewhat betrays you. I assumed you noticed in the last year summarized, Ridgewood is down 2 points. Little by little Ridgewood has consistently gone downwards. A main problem is the unfairness of ranking private schools and county Academies–all of which attract the top students in any school–against public schools which must educate every student who applies. It is the true “apples vs oranges” comparison. That alone would automatically force lowering of the ranks of any public school. But Ridgewood is no where near being at the top of the public school list. Ridgewood has always had problems–terrible tenured teachers and some other very strange teachers who bullied their students–but basically it provided a great education for self-starters. Lazy kids still did not work up to their educational level–and I’m sure that is true today. Another main difference is that the respect for teachers and authority figures has declined drastically. Too many students think the whole world revolves around them and rebel against anyone telling them what to do. We also have more parents who’ll rush to the school or school board to complain that ” their darling child could never do anything wrong”. Believe me, this is not a new problem, it’s just gotten worse. A friend, who retired at least 15 years ago from being a kindergarten teacher, said that “she never thought she’d be happy to retire, but the kids today…”

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Reader says Ridgewood Schools Remain Strong

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4 generations here and I do not agree with your subjective essay about Ridgewood schools declining compared to other public schools. Your observation about no child left behind being a negative is valid for all public schools not just Ridgewood. Private schools will likely continue to benefit from this advantage but truth is they always have.
Rank History for Ridgewood High School, does not show decline.
This graph shows how well Ridgewood High School is performing relative to other high schools in New Jersey.
https://www.schooldigger.com/go/NJ/schools/1383000764/school.aspx?t=tbRankings

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Reader says ,”School Decline due to a shift in focus from academic “excellence” to social engineering”

Ridgewood schools are in decline… compared to ALL schools in NJ (and nationally).
You can cherry pick schools for comparison, but it DOES NOT change the fact that Ridgewood schools are not as esteemed as they were in the past. It is disgraceful given the amount of time, money and support (parental and otherwise) that they get. This is laregly due to a shift in focus from academic “excellence” to social engineering.
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Sad, but an unavoidable truth.

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Reader Takes a Long term View of Ridgewood Schools

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“If you are a newish resident (anytime in the last 20 years) you would probably only notice a small decline in comparison with the forward motion of schools who used to be behind us and are now in front–often by many points. If you’ve lived here longer you will have noticed a fairly large increase of staff in the education supervisors. A department that either did not exist or only had at most one or two employees now has increased to an assistant to every assistant who works for a supervisor.

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Ridgewood Crew Perform Impressively at the 2019 5th Manny Flick

the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Ridgewood NJ, For the third week in a row, the Ridgewood Crew athletes took to the water, this time for the final event in the pre-season series. Sunday, April 14, 2019, on the Schuylkill River in Philadelphia, 85 rowing clubs gathered to compete in the 5th Manny Flick. Ridgewood had 15 boats race in 13 events. Award Winning Results included…

Continue reading Ridgewood Crew Perform Impressively at the 2019 5th Manny Flick
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Reader gives Performance Rundown for Ridgewood Schools

RHS_theridgewoodblog

Ridgewood Schools are great and performance is not declining in comparison to Tenefly and Summit and other schools. I really wish this person would stop with the fake news. By nthe way, all these school districts are great and all our taxes are high. Ridgewood is not some kind of outlier and we are not declining. Be upset about high taxes but stop with the BS that we are somehow worse than we are. The problem is with the STATE of NJ, and NY and CT and Mass, and the entire northeast.
Tenefly=20,920 per student Ridgewood= 20,481 Summit=20,529 Princeton= 25,194 Glen Rock= 21,009
Tenefly:
2016-17 Total Spending: $77,250,029
2016-17 Costs Amount per Pupil: $20,920
Ridgewood:
2016-17 Total Spending: $117,443,609
2016-17 Costs Amount per Pupil: $20,481
Summit:
2016-17 Total Spending: $84,530,788
2016-17 Costs Amount per Pupil: $20,529
Princeton:
2016-17 Total Spending: $94,715,589
2016-17 Costs Amount per Pupil: $25,194
Glen Rock:
2016-17 Total Spending: $52,944,004
2016-17 Costs Amount per Pupil: $21,099

cost per student by STATE: NY is highest followed by Washington DC, Connecticut and then NJ
https://www.governing.com/gov-data/education-data/state-education-spending-per-pupil-data.html

in NJ the forth highest in the country we are not unusual yet we are one of the best school districts
https://www.state.nj.us/education/guide/

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Reader claims , “the indifference of residents that is killing this town”

VOTE_theridgewoodblog

It is the indifference of residents that is killing this town. Spring break or no spring break, those who are interested to vote would have found a way to do it. People who move here anew just do not care to get involved in local issues. They come mainly from metropolitan area and have the typical indifferent mindset. They are under the false impression that everything is prefect in this place they chose to live especially the schools. Half the village has no idea what high density housing is and how the place is being transformed into a mini city or how the RHS is approaching 2000 students and is the size of a small college.
Developers and narrow minded local politicians love this kind of place where they can easily make $$$ without any major trouble.

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Reader sound off on $111 Million Ridgewood School Budget vote

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211 voter spread yes vs no

we had a chance to send a message of constraint but the non voters
in an ironic way let the spenders spend.

it’s not their fault individually but when the tax bill comes
non voters dig deep into a pocket of regrets.

towns spending and BOE BUDGETS non sustainable
and is a runaway train signaling time to paint and sell.

wait till the developers get ahold of valley campus..schools
will be flooded with new children.

9 out of 19 districts voted majority “No”. Absentee ballots accounted for 3/4 of the margin of victory for “Yes”. The B of E was nearly embarrassed here.